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There is no lack of evidence for plasma currents in space, and these currents come in all sizes.

There are the truly huge ones, stringing galaxies together like pearls on a string. Then there are the big ones that do the same for stars. Then there are the relatively small ones connecting planets to their central star. These are responsible for the auroras that we see in the atmosphere of planets.

The overall impression is that of a neural network with stars and galaxies forming the nodes and the plasma currents forming the synapses.

In all of this, there are the occasional bright flashes. These are the so called supernovas.

Standard cosmology attribute these flashes to the death of stars. However, Donald Scott suggests otherwise. He sees them as the births of stars and planets.

As we have already discussed regarding Jupiter and Venus, large planets with thick mineral rich atmospheres can give birth to smaller objects by ejecting a highly charged body the size of a planet or moon.

Stars can do this too. But when they do, the size of the object ejected is that much larger. Large stars can sweat off objects the size of gas giants or small stars.

This explains why binary star systems are relatively common, and why gas giants can be found very close to stars.

All of this is accompanied by bright flashes. However, only the brightest of them are categorised as a supernova, and to explain the most energetic flashes, something much bigger must be going on.

The biggest supernovas are most likely due to short circuiting of large plasma currents. The technical term for such a short circuit is a z-pinch, and it has the effect of pulling matter together.

A z-pinch can easily be produced in an electrical laboratory.

Pinched aluminium can, produced from a pulsed magnetic field By Bert Hickman, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=28083081
Pinched aluminium can, produced from a pulsed magnetic field By Bert Hickman, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=28083081

As can be seen in the above picture, a z-pinch can crush an aluminium can. If the can had been made of something more fluid, it would have been crushed completely.

Keeping in mind that electricity scales very well from the very small to the positively enormous, we can now imagine a dusty, mineral rich plasma current with a diameter many times that of a solar system.

Such a current would be like an enormous cylinder with several layers of positively and negatively charged tubes nested inside each other.

In balance with itself, the current will be cold and invisible, only detectable by the fact that there is a star at each end of it.

However, should such a current short circuit, there would be an enormous flash, followed by a lingering glow.

The glow will be visible as an hourglass shape similar to the crushed aluminium can depicted above.

The Hourglass Nebula (MyCn18), a supernova remnant By NASA, R. Sahai, J. Trauger (JPL), and The WFPC2 Science Team - http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/opo9607a/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1849193
The Hourglass Nebula (MyCn18), a supernova remnant By NASA, R. Sahai, J. Trauger (JPL), and The WFPC2 Science Team - http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/opo9607a/, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1849193

The pinch takes only a few hours to form. At its centre is a brand new star, quite possibly surrounded by planets with moons.

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