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In a picture taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, a jet of matter can be clearly seen ejected from the centre of a galaxy. The jet is 4,400 light-year long.

Plasma jet ejected by a galaxy By NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) HubbleSite: gallery, release., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=102873
Plasma jet ejected by a galaxy By NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) HubbleSite: gallery, release., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=102873

The fact that the jet hardly disperses over such a long distance suggests that it is highly charge. A strong magnetic field is required to keep something like this together over such a long distance, and the most likely source of that magnetic field is the jet itself.

Charged gases such as these are generally referred to as electric plasma. Their behaviours are different from electrical neutral gases. For one thing, they can keep together for enormous distances without dispersing.

Donald Scott, a contributor to the Thundrerbolt Project, has a very insightful lecture on this topic, worth looking up on the web for those interested in more information on this. In the same lecture, he discusses the mechanisms behind planetary formations.

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