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For a bouncing electron to go up one harmonic, it has to absorb a specific quantum of energy. To go down one harmonic, it has to release an energy quantum.

These energy quanta come in the form of photons.

In conventional physics, the photon absorbed or released is nothing more than a quantum of pure energy. It can therefore be created and destroyed whenever needed.

However, if photons are made of dielectric matter that can neither be created nor destroyed, the sudden appearance and disappearance of photons must be explained in some other way. There has to be a pool of photons available for the energy transfer.

Low energy photons must be everywhere present so that they can be kicked up in energy. However, they must not be so abundant that the energy transfer always happen immediately after an electron has been excited into a higher energy level.

The low energy photons have to be at a certain abundance corresponding to the typical time it takes for an excited electron to stay excited before returning to its lower energy level.

The process of excitement into a higher energy level, followed by the subsequent drop to a lower energy level will have to go as follows:

  • A random high energy photon hits a bouncing electron.
  • A quantum of energy is transferred from the photon to the electron.
  • The electron bounces at a higher harmonic.
  • A random low energy photon hits the excited electron.
  • A quantum of energy is transferred from the electron to the photon.
  • The electron bounces at a lower harmonic.

The time delay between step 2 and step 5 is determined by the availability of photons.

Electron of Neon being excited by an incoming high energy photon: step 1, 2 and 3
Electron of Neon being excited by an incoming high energy photon: step 1, 2 and 3
Exited electron of Neon kicking a random low energy photon up in energy: step 4, 5 and 6
Exited electron of Neon kicking a random low energy photon up in energy: step 4, 5 and 6

For this to work, there must be a lot more photons around than is observed. They would have to be everywhere, and the vast majority of them would have to be in an undetectable state.

In short, we require an aether.

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