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Mars has a scar. It’s called Valles Marineris.

Mars with Valles Marineris clearly visible By NASA / USGS (see PIA04304 catalog page) - http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/photo_gallery/photogallery-mars.html http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/image/planetary/mars/marsglobe1.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19400
Mars with Valles Marineris clearly visible By NASA / USGS (see PIA04304 catalog page) - http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/photo_gallery/photogallery-mars.html http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/image/planetary/mars/marsglobe1.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=19400

This scar is either a rift due to planetary expansion or the result of a prolonged electrical discharge between itself and another planet. Which one of the two it is can be determined by taking note of certain tell tale features.

The edges of the scar have the characteristic zigzag pattern that electricity produces.

The scar is widest in the middle by quite a lot. This is also where a number of smaller scars are formed, indicating a widening out of the current flow at the moment the two planets were the closest together.

The scar is wide all the way. It does not taper into a very fine line, which we would expect from planetary expansion.

To the left in the picture, we can see a round pattern. The discharge has been lingering at this point as the two planets moved away from each other. This is what discharges do. Once an arc has been established, the connection is not immediately broken by pulling away. It sticks.

Valles Marineris can therefore be taken as evidence of a rogue planet that once roamed our solar system. This rogue planet may have been Mars itself. It may also have been some other planet, possibly one that was successfully ejected by Mars.

It appears then that some great battle took place in the heavens in some distant past. It may not be entirely coincidental that Mars is known as the god of war.

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