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Magnetic fields fan out to the side. Outgoing photons allow incoming photons to come in between them. The outgoing photons yield to the incoming ones.

If we place a bar magnet under a sheet of paper, and sprinkle iron filings on top of it, we can see how this fanning out continues in all directions so that we get a pattern that connects the north pole to the south pole.

Magnetic field lines illustrated by iron filings on paper above a magnet. By Newton Henry Black - Newton Henry Black, Harvey N. Davis (1913) Practical Physics, The MacMillan Co., USA, p. 242, fig. 200, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=73846
Magnetic field lines illustrated by iron filings on paper above a magnet. By Newton Henry Black - Newton Henry Black, Harvey N. Davis (1913) Practical Physics, The MacMillan Co., USA, p. 242, fig. 200, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=73846

Polarized photons stream out from the north and the south pole of magnets in equal measure. However, there is no overall flow. All that is happening is that the polarized photons arrange themselves in the most efficient manner possible. Magnets polarize zero-point photons which in turn polarize all photons in the entire space around the magnet.

If two magnets are placed so that their north poles or south poles face each other, polarized photons from the magnets will meet head on in a non-abrasive collision. Since the colliding orbs are of the same charge, there is no latching onto each other. There are no hard turns, so the photons will tend to stay in the field. The result is a high pressure in the aether between the magnets. We have a repelling force.

Non-abrasive collisions between photons produce high pressure
Non-abrasive collisions between photons produce high pressure

Conversely, if a north pole is facing a south pole, polarized photons collide with hooks against hoops. The collisions are abrasive. The photons latch onto each other. They make a hard turn and exit the field. This results in a low pressure area in the aether between the magnets. We have an attracting force.

Abrasive collisions between photons produce low pressure
Abrasive collisions between photons produce low pressure

This is identical to how neutrinos produce high pressure and low pressure areas in the aether through collisions. The magnetic force is communicated by photons in the exact same way that the electric force is communicated by neutrinos.

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