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The double slit experiment has been used as “proof” that not just photons, but all things have wave-like properties. The larger an object is, the smaller is its frequency. Many things are so large that their wavelength cannot be detected. However, according to this wave-theory of matter, all things have wavelength.

Many double slit experiments have been performed, and they all seem to verify this theory. Red photons have the longest wavelength. Blue photons have shorter wavelengths. Electrons have shorter wavelengths still. Atomic nuclei have wavelengths too, and even molecules have been measured to have wavelengths, extremely small, but detectable.

However, all that this proves is that there is interference taking place when particles are passed through narrow slits, and that this interference is related to the size of the particles involved.

Double slit experiment set-up
Double slit experiment set-up

What baffles people is the fact that an interference pattern appears at the detector/wall at the far end of the double slit experiment set-up even if only one particle is let through the slits in the barrier at a time.

But this is only a mystery if there’s no aether. As soon as we include an aether of zero-point particles, the mystery of the observed interference pattern goes away.

Since zero-point particles come in two types, namely neutrinos and zero-point photons, they resonate with each other. These particles form a standing wave in which certain regions of space are more likely to contain a zero-point photon than other regions.

When a relatively large particle is sent through space, it bobs along on the standing wave. This creates a disturbance in the standing wave that propagates together with the particle.

This disturbance passes through the two slits like a wave in a lake. The particle moves like a vessel through these waves.

The larger the particle, the less it is affected by the waves, and the tighter is the pattern observed at the detector. Blue light produces a tighter pattern than red light. Electrons produce tighter patterns than photons. Atoms produce tighter patterns than electrons, and molecules produce the tightest of all patterns.

Photon bobbing along on a disturbed standing wave of zero-point particles
Photon bobbing along on a disturbed standing wave of zero-point particles

Every detectable particle produces a wave front as it moves through the aether. This wave front is commonly referred to as the pilot wave.

What is detected at the receiver is not the wavelengths of particles, but the size of detectable particles relative to their respective pilot waves.

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